Bookish Beats: Massive Attack – Mezzanine


Bookish BeatsMusic, much like literature, has the power to drive your imagination; it can lift the soul and create real emotion.This is Bookish Beats, a feature which will showcase some of the soundtracks which have enriched the worlds I’ve found between the pages. 


Mezzanine

Massive Attack


Listen to with:

A beautiful but gritty fantasy

Such as:

The House of Shattered Wings by Aliette de Bodard

Massive Attack returns in this week’s Bookish Beats with their phenomenal album Mezzanine. This modern masterpiece is, without a doubt, one of my favourite albums of all time and after a countless number listens has become one of my go-to albums whilst reading. If you’re looking for a soundtrack to a beautiful gritty fantasy, whether its urban or epic or something in between, then you can’t go far wrong with Mezzanine. This album really is a beauty.

Mezzanine is a throbbing, beautifully strange and artistic album which brought a surge of electronica to Massive Attack’s trip hop sound. Released in 1998 to wide critical acclaim, Mezzanine became Massive Attack’s most commercially successful album and, almost twenty years later, it’s not hard to see why. This is an atmospheric and addictive musical masterpiece whose lazy, rolling and electronica suffused beats, and surfeit of wonderful vocalists, have you reaching for the repeat button time after time.

Mezzanine opens with Angel, an almost hypnotic track whose slow beat and drawn out vocals take you to another world entirely. Featuring the reggae singer Horace Andy, whose vocals also appear in every one of Massive Attack’s other albums (his contribution to Heligoland on the track Girl I Love You is one of my all time favourites), this is one artist who doesn’t fail to make his presence felt with this pulsating, rhythmic and incredibly haunting track. Man Next Door, a track which features Andy’s reverberating and beat led vocals, becomes increasingly addictive as it reaches its pitch and is one of my favourite tracks on this entire album.

But there is another outstanding vocal contributor to Mezzanine who is more than worthy of a mention. Elizabeth Fraser of the Cocteau Twins, whose wonderful vocals also feature on The Lord of the Rings soundtrack on both Lothlorien and Isengard Unleashed, is a singer whose haunting and eerily addictive vocals contribute to some of the most stunning tracks on this album. Teardrop is arguably the most well known track on Mezzanine and for good reason; an emotive and incredibly beautiful piece, this is a track which ensnares you in Fraser’s vocals and refuses to let you go. But her genius doesn’t end there. Black Milk, another highlight from this album of highlights, and Group Four, one of my favourite tracks, both carry you above a steady underlying beat on a tide of Fraser’s haunting and brilliant vocals; vocals which truly make for a unique album.

Mezzanine is a phenomenal album which deserves its well recognised status. Horace Andy and Elizabeth Fraser make a stunning contribution and, for those of you who have yet to sample the Cocteau Twins or Andy’s other work, I urge you to check them out. Massive Attack never fail to impress and with Mezzanine have provided a wonderful backdrop to countless literary delights. This is one album which can’t be missed.

Favourite track

10 – Group Four

07 – Man Next Door

Top track for action

04 – Inertia Creeps

Top track for tension

01 – Angel

Top track for emotion

03 – Teardrop

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Bookish Beats: Bonobo – Black Sands


Bookish BeatsMusic, much like literature, has the power to drive your imagination; it can lift the soul and create real emotion.This is Bookish Beats, a feature which will showcase some of the soundtracks which have enriched the worlds I’ve found between the pages. 


Black Sands

Bonobo


Listen to with:

An atmospheric science fantasy

Such as:

Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer

Black Sands is the fourth studio album from Bonobo, the stage name for musician and DJ Simon Green. Following on from the success of his previous three albums, Black Sands, with its combination of electronic beats, world music – in particular its eastern and afrobeat inspired tracks – and jazz, is a beautifully composed chillout album which succeeds in transporting you to another place.

Black Sands opens with Prelude, a beautiful and soaring track whose violin melody exhibits the eastern influence which is drawn throughout the rest of the album. This atmospheric melody is similarly picked up by other tracks and remains one of my favourite Bonobo tracks to date. Kiara samples Prelude to maximum effect, using electronic beats and distorted vocals to create an addictive track which retains the beauty and atmosphere of the original whilst adding dynamism and pace to an otherwise perfect melody. Similarly, Kong uses a repetitive melody which continues to build on the atmosphere in a supremely chilled out track which resonates with positive beats.

Eyesdown introduces some vocals into the mix with the soulful sounds of Andreya Triana, whose vocals are featured in a number of tracks throughout the album. With its repetitive and paced beat and electronic underscore, Eyesdown is another track which instantly takes you out of this world. Triana’s vocals return in The Keeper, a track which succeeds in slowing the pace of the album right down; and again in Stay the Same, which showcases the beautiful tone of Triana’s voice in this jazz and soul inspired track.

Black Sands builds on the success of these tracks with a number of instrumentals which set the tone and pace of the album, introducing new themes and diverting it where necessary. El ToroWe Could Forever and Animals are upbeat, jazz influenced tracks which revel in their own beat. 1009 uses traditional electronic beats to create a dance inspired track which remains tied to the rest of the album through the use of a steady electronic violin overtone.

All in Forms is another favourite from this album; an upbeat track which retains a haunting quality through sampled vocals which create an eerie and distorted atmosphere, both complementing and setting themselves apart from the rest of the track. This atmosphere is picked up again in Black Sands, the titular and closing track of the album; a beautiful, slow and haunting track which has an old world quality to it, playing off a sad melody against a positive beat.

This is a beautiful chillout album which provides a wonderful backdrop to reading. I wouldn’t normally have paired an album with such a positive overtone with a heady and atmospheric book such as Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer, but its success in transporting you to another world only emphasised the strange of this novel. They say opposites attract, I guess they’re right.

Favourite track

01 – Prelude

Top track for action

02 – Kiara

Top track for tension

08 – All in Forms

Top track for emotion

12 – Black Sands

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Bookish Beats: Moby – Play


Bookish BeatsMusic, much like literature, has the power to drive your imagination; it can lift the soul and create real emotion.This is Bookish Beats, a feature which will showcase some of the soundtracks which have enriched the worlds I’ve found between the pages. 


Play

Moby


Listen to with:

A post-apocalyptic sci-fi adventure

Such as:

Falling Sky by Rajan Khanna

We’re back this week with Moby’s stunning album from 1999, Play. This is a defining album of my childhood – one of those which stops you in your tracks and changes your entire perspective on music – and the first which drew my attention to Moby.

Play is a catchy, fun, soaring and lyrical electronica mash-up which captures emotion and heartbreak in its folk and blues laden tracks whilst contrasting the incredibly chilled out with the extremely upbeat. This is another of my go-to albums when reading, one which never tires and one which remains relevant all these years later.

This is an album of parts, and one where favourites are incredibly difficult to narrow down. The tracks range from the beautiful and heart-wrenching, to the downbeat and chilled out, to the fun and uplifting. It’s not impossible to go through a full rollercoaster of emotions when listening to Play, and it isn’t difficult for it to truly enhance whatever it is you’re reading.

Much of the success of this album comes from the careful sampling of other artists, using their music to create an atmosphere and elicit a reaction. Play does this incredibly successfully with tracks such as Natural Blues, which samples Vera Hall, and Why Does My Heart Feel So Bad?, which samples Banks Brothers. These are two of the most emotive tracks on the album; incredibly beautiful, exceptionally heartfelt and highly addictive.

This same tone is picked up in tracks such as Find My Baby, which retains an element of the emotive whilst conjuring up an uplifting atmosphere, and Honey, an incredibly catchy track with repetitive vocals and folk guitars which is very hard not to listen to whilst reading fight scenes. For some reason, It just works.

Play is also incredibly successful in creating those chill-out tracks which create a subtle atmosphere, those which you can just listen to and watch the world pass you by. Porcelain is a perfect example of this, along with Rushing, Inside and My Weakness. Whether they come with vocals or not, these tracks instantly stick in your mind and give your world, or that between your pages, a slower pace.

This is contrasted with some of the more upbeat and fast-paced tracks on the album, such as Machete and Bodyrock which build up tempo by leaning heavily on the electro. Run On and Honey, however, use folk music samples to create fast-paced tracks which are instantly uplifting and retain an element of fun through their catchy melodies. This same uplifting vibe is echoed in some of the instrumental tracks, such as Everloving.

Play is a masterpiece which stands for repeated listens and, in fact, only seems to get better the more you’re exposed to it. This is an album which in reality could be listened to with anything; whether a post-apocalyptic sci-fi adventure, or a tense thriller. Give it a try and see what you think.

Favourite track

02 – Find My Baby

08 – Natural Blues

Top track for action

01 – Honey

Top track for tension

09 – Machete

Top track for emotion

08 – Natural Blues

04 – Why Does My Heart Feel So Bad?

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Bookish Beats: Massive Attack – Heligoland


Bookish BeatsMusic, much like literature, has the power to drive your imagination; it can lift the soul and create real emotion.This is Bookish Beats, a feature which will showcase some of the soundtracks which have enriched the worlds I’ve found between the pages. 


Heligoland

Massive Attack


Listen to with:

A thrilling urban fantasy

Such as:

Broken Homes by Ben Aaronovitch

This week we’re taking a break from my love of film and game soundtracks to listen to a band which have topped my list of favourites for an inordinately long time. Massive Attack have repeatedly produced incredible album after incredible album, and their perfect fusion of wildly differing beats and melodies have made them industry leaders in the rise of trip hop.

Heligoland, released in 2010, is Massive Attack’s fifth studio album and, with its seriously chilled out, downbeat vibes and lazy electro undertones, is the perfect backdrop to reading – and to urban fantasy in particular. This is an album which is soulful and atmospheric, and only gets better with each successive listen.

The opening track Pray For Rain, with its gentle vocals and rolling, lazy beat, sets the tone for the rest of the album, and fans of the brilliant crime drama Luther will instantly recognise its theme tune in the deceptively haunting Paradise Circus. Heligoland, which with Girl I Love You has produced one of my favourite Massive Attack tracks of all time, is a triumph of downbeat, rhythmic tracks which only become more addictive the more they are listened to.

This is an album of halves, an album which celebrates the fusion of different sounds and tones for maximum effect, and an album which makes one brilliant and mesmerising whole. Babel, a long-time favourite, succeeds in combining a fast-paced and tuneful melody with an understated and relaxed vibe made apparent throughout the entire album. Splitting the Atom contrasts a deep male vocal with an insistent, repeating melody which has a similar effect to Rush Minute, a track which combines a fast paced backing track with a soft and creeping vocal.

If you’re looking for an album which instantly gives off a city vibe and provides an effortless backdrop to any urban fantasy, then give Heligoland a listen. I can’t imagine reading Rivers of London without it.

Favourite track

04 – Girl I Love You

Top track for action

02 – Babel

Top track for tension

01 – Pray For Rain

Top track for emotion

08 – Rush Minute

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Bookish ‘Sci-Fi’ Beats: Ex Machina OST


Sci-Fi Bookish BeatsMusic, much like literature, has the power to drive your imagination; it can lift the soul and create real emotion. This is Bookish Beats, a feature which will showcase some of the soundtracks which have enriched the worlds I’ve found between the pages. 


Ex Machina (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Score Composed by Ben Salisbury and Geoff Barrow


Listen to with:

A tense science fiction thriller

Such as:

Slow Bullets by Alastair Reynolds

The Ex Machina soundtrack is pure atmospheric ambience. Created by Ben Salisbury and Portishead’s Geoff Barrow, this is a soundtrack which celebrates electronic music; transporting you to another time, another place… and maybe even another world. Dark electronic synths fall across a backdrop of moody reverberating tension to create a score which could only have emerged as a result of pure science fiction inspiration, and which succeeds in creating an incredibly evocative backdrop for reading any science fiction thriller. The Ex Machina soundtrack is subtle and understated yet retains a flair for the dramatic that excites, ripples with tension and keeps the button pressed firmly on repeat.

From the opening track – The Turing Test which, with its distinctive combination of a rolling and beating melody interwoven with dark electronic synths, introduces one of the soundtrack’s main themes – this soundtrack establishes an unyielding atmosphere which remains undiluted throughout the entire score. Watching continues this ambient theme but is overlaid with an electronic beat which slowly transforms into a beautiful creeping melody before disappearing beneath a cloud of tension, cut through with a low and wavering bass.

Ava is an entirely different type of track. There is a certain innocence which permeates the background of tension and the melody is reminiscent of the tune from a musical jewellery box. This same melody is echoed in other tracks such as The Test Worked, a piece which is saturated in gentle ambience until the score’s other main theme – a rousing and repeating electronic melody – cuts in. Skin also features echoes of this ‘jewellery box’ theme before transforming and intensifying until the gentle beat becomes a pounding, climactic finale. Out, which is one of the score’s stand-out tracks, plays with this same gentle tone but transforms it into fast-paced and melodic electronic number.

Falling is an incredibly beautiful track which is a combination of atmosphere, gentle melodies and intensifying tension which reaches a pounding and dramatic climax. This tension is an essential characteristic of the entire soundtrack and, in tracks such as Hacking / Cutting and I Am Become Death, is intensified and entwined with ambience, rhythmic beats and almost discordant sections, which gradually build the pace until cutting out to a whining reverberating chord. Bunsen Burner, a track by Cuts, uses the score’s electronic theme to create a tense and sweeping action track which creates a triumphant finale to phenomenal score.

This is a soundtrack which impresses with its subtle drama and tense atmosphere. If you’re looking for an ambient soundtrack which echoes the character of a moody science fiction thriller, then Ex Machina may just be the perfect score.

Favourite tracks

04 – Falling

Top track for action

10 – Bunsen Burner

Top track for tension

06 – Hacking / Cutting

Top track for emotion

09 – Out

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If you like the Ex Machina soundtrack, you may also want to try The Machine soundtrack

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Bookish ‘Sci-Fi’ Beats: Oblivion OST


Sci-Fi Bookish BeatsMusic, much like literature, has the power to drive your imagination; it can lift the soul and create real emotion. This is Bookish Beats, a feature which will showcase some of the soundtracks which have enriched the worlds I’ve found between the pages. 


Oblivion (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Score Composed by Anthony Gonzalez & Joseph Trapanese

Original Music by M83


Listen to with:

An action-packed sci-fi epic

Such as:

Inquisitor by Mitchell Hogan

Welcome back to another week of Bookish Beats. We’ve had a little break from this feature whilst I attempt to organise myself but this week we’re back with a vengence with the Oblivion OST.

This soundtrack is the result of a phenomenal collaboration between director Joseph Kosinski and the French electronic group M83. Following the success of the Tron Legacy soundtrack, in which Kosinski drafted in Daft Punk to create the score, the Oblivion director again went down the alternative route and selected M83 to score the soundtrack alongside Joseph Trapanese.  M83 have succeeded in creating a powerfully tense and mesmerising score which compliments the movie whilst being a stunning album in its own right.

With nods to traditional classically composed soundtracks, M83 have created an electronic symphony which flows effortlessly from one track to another and provides the perfect backdrop to any science fiction novel. Opening up with Jack’s Dream, a short piece which feels at home in a science fiction epic – grand, slow and powerful – and flowing on to Waking Up, a brilliant, slow building track which introduces the main theme present throughout the OST; this soundtrack builds to fantastic heights and provides a full complement of tracks for action, for atmosphere and tension, and for haunting emotive scenes.

Atmospheric tension is a common theme throughout this soundtrack where discordant sounds and repetitive beats create pieces which wouldn’t be out of place on a game soundtrack. Tech 49Odyssey Rescue and Losing Control are all slow building, tense tracks which reach powerful and often haunting crescendos, Radiation Zone uses elements from the main theme and overlays it with a powerful drum solo, and Temples of Our Gods uses choral pieces to give a tense track an element of grandeur.

The Oblivion OST also presents a number of impressive action tracks with Earth 2077, which weaves an electronic theme throughout this epic and all encompassing symphonic number, and Canyon Battle, a similarly tense and powerful action track which uses electronic synth melodies to get your heart pumping and succeeds in creating one of the best action tracks I’ve heard in a long while.

But this soundtrack is not without its truly haunting an emotive pieces either. You Can’t Save HerRaven RockStarwaves are all incredibly beautiful and emotive tracks, and Ashes of Our FathersUndimmed by Time, Unbound by DeathI’m Sending You Away and Fearful Odds are all downbeat chillout numbers which use haunting renditions of the main theme to create a perfect combination of tension and emotion. Something which is similarly found in the final track of the album, Oblivion, performed by Norwegian singer-songwriter Susanne Sundfør.

If you’re looking for a soundtrack to a science fiction epic then you could do much worse than the Oblivion OST. The electronic overlays give it a true science fiction feeling making it the perfect backdrop to a good book.

Favourite tracks

02 – Waking Up

Top track for action

08 – Canyon Battle

Top track for tension

07 – Losing Control

Top track for emotion

04 – Starwaves

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Bookish Beats: Inception OST


Bookish BeatsMusic, much like literature, has the power to drive your imagination; it can lift the soul and create real emotion.This is Bookish Beats, a feature which will showcase some of the soundtracks which have enriched the worlds I’ve found between the pages. 


Inception 2

Inception (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Composed by Hans Zimmer


Listen to with:

An action-packed sci-fi thriller

Such as:

Red Rising by Pierce Brown

This week’s Bookish Beats is taking another visit to the silver screen with the Inception soundtrack, the stunning score composed by the incomparable Hans Zimmer. This soundtrack combines fast-paced action with tense atmospheric ambience to create an incredibly emotive and infinitely memorable score. The Inception OST is both powerful and haunting and is undoubtedly one of my favourite movie soundtracks of all time.

Inception is a soundtrack which Zimmer composed ‘blind’ – he wasn’t allowed to see the film once Christopher Nolan started editing the footage. This allowed Zimmer to wholly concentrate on the narrative of the film and has led to the creation of a liberated and multi-layered soundtrack which incorporates atmospheric electronics with a powerful brass section overlaid by the sweeping guitar sounds of Johnny Marr.

One of the most interesting features of this soundtrack is the use of the instantly recognisable horn section to denote a change from one level of dreaming to another. This beat was a slowed down extraction from Édith Piaf’s Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien, which also features in the soundtrack and movie.

This soundtrack’s heavy reliance on ambience makes this the perfect backdrop for reading, whilst its recognisable and powerful tracks provide a perfect backdrop to action and tense moments. Half Remembered Dream and One Simple Idea are both heavily atmospheric tracks, whilst Waiting for a Train, which samples Edith Piaf’s Non, je ne regrette rienstarts off in the same otherworldly way, gradually building the tension until the Piaf break where it fully saturates the track.

Action and tension are very much intertwined in this soundtrack. Dream Is Collapsing is incredibly iconic, the drawn out horn section powering slowly and deliberately to a backdrop of tense strings instantly transports you to a completely different world. Radical Notion takes the powerful horn section and repeats it in this paired down track, incorporating synths and string sections to create an eerie resonance throughout. Mombasa, however, is an action track through and through.

This score is not without it’s beautiful orchestral pieces either. The gentle, sweeping and downbeat We Built Our Own World and Old Soulsas well as the hugely popular Time are Inception’s key emotive tracks. There are also many tracks which exhibit the multi-layered approach – the dream-shift – to become tracks of two halves. 528491 opens with a slow, emotive piece which builds to a tense crescendo whilst Dream Within a Dream takes the same elements as Dream Is Collapsing to create a tense duality.

The Inception soundtrack is a beautiful and otherworldly score which can be listened to again and again and will remain one of my favourite backdrops for reading. Just listen for a moment and you’ll feel that shift and find yourself transported into the story – a world within a world.

Favourite track

03 – Dream is Collapsing

Top track for action

07 – Mombasa

Top track for tension

10 – Waiting for a Train

Top track for emotion

12 – Time

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Bookish Beats: Audiomachine – Phenomena


Bookish BeatsMusic, much like literature, has the power to drive your imagination; it can lift the soul and create real emotion.This is Bookish Beats, a feature which will showcase some of the soundtracks which have enriched the worlds I’ve found between the pages. 


Phenomena

Audiomachine


Listen to with:

An action-packed fantasy adventure

Such as:

The Stormcaller by Tom Lloyd

This week’s Bookish Beats features Audiomachine, a production company who produce music for movie, TV and game trailers. Audiomachine’s composers, Paul Dinletir and Kevin Rix, have written music for countless trailers including those of The Hobbit, Harry Potter and Prometheus, and I first came across them whilst listening to the Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare soundtrack, which they composed alongside Harry Gregson-Williams.

Phenomena manages to capture epic and grand scale action perfectly, combining powerful brass and percussion sections with soaring strings and choral vocals. Those tracks which start off slow gradually build to a crescendo, each one a snapshot of a moment – an epic scene. It is not hard to visualise wars and battles, and quests and adventures when listening to Phenomena, and its tracks have featured on the Lego: The Hobbit game trailer, Exodus: God and Kings film trailer, and even the 2014 Winter Olympics.

And if you’re reading a fast-paced, action-packed novel then Phenomena is a perfect compliment. Every single track is sure to sweep you away, whether on a tide of eerie vocals and strings or in a surge of blood-pumping percussion. Stand-out action tracks include Blood and Stone and Lords of Lankhmar; Crossing Destiny and God of the Drow are brimming with tension; and Ice of the Phoenix and Epiphany are the epitome of triumph.

Phenomena may be chock full of ‘triumphant’ tracks but it’s not without its quiet moments either… quietly epic that is; Red Sorrow, Fortress of Solitude and Legacy of the Lost are tracks filled with emotion – the slower and drawn out pace capturing the full spectrum of sensations. Or tracks such as The Last Ember are a mind-blowing combination of action, tension and emotion.

If you’re looking for something to read epic or heroic fantasy to, then look no further; Phenomena is a phenomenal soundtrack for movies, games and books alike. And if Phenomena whets your appetite, Audiomachine has a whole host of other albums to keep you hooked. This is definitely one for the playlist.

Favourite track

06 – Legends of Destiny

Top track for action

01 – Blood and Stone

Top track for tension

09 – Crossing Destiny

16 – God of the Drow

Top track for emotion

14 – Fortress of Solitude

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Bookish Beats: Enigma – The Cross of Changes


Bookish BeatsMusic, much like literature, has the power to drive your imagination; it can lift the soul and create real emotion.This is Bookish Beats, a feature which will showcase some of the soundtracks which have enriched the worlds I’ve found between the pages. 


The Cross of Changes

Enigma


Listen to with:

Tense or mysterious historical fiction

Such as:

Azincourt by Bernard Cornwell

This week we’re leaving the soundtracks behind and putting on some of the most atmospheric music I have in my collection. Enigma have been on my playlist (and/or mix-tapes) ever since I was a child when my parents would put on album after album as we drove around France. This calming ‘new-age’ music which, most importantly, two little girls couldn’t sing along to (though not for lack of trying!), created a love for Enigma which has lasted a lifetime.

Enigma are a German new-age, experimental electro group who are famed for sampling and incorporating Gregorian and other old world style chanting into their music. Their first album, MCMXC a.D. catapulted them to fame in 1990 and, after seven studio albums, still continue to produce music today. The Cross of Changes, released in 1993, replaced the famed Gregorian chants of MCMXC a.D. with an ethnic influence, featuring Native American and Mongolian music to produce an incredibly atmospheric album which contains some of my favourite Enigma tracks to date.

This album takes the listener on a journey; it’s soaring and atmospheric, relaxing and spiritual, down-beat yet dramatic – it truly never gets old. Return to Innocence is probably the most well known track on the album but the breathtaking Age of Loneliness, which was written for the film Sliver, and the haunting The Eyes of Truth, which was used in The Matrix trailer in 1999, are two of my all time favourite Enigma tracks. Silent Warrior, down-beat and distinctive, and I Love You… I’ll Kill You, with its catchy melody and screaming guitar solo, are two other stand-out tracks.

Every time I crack open some historical fiction, I can usually rely on Enigma to provide an excellent soundtrack. Whether it’s the Gregorian chants of MXCMX a.D. or the hypnotic tracks of The Cross of Changes, Enigma continue to surprise and create incredible music which has become the perfect backdrop for a good book. If you’ve never listened to Enigma, maybe you should give it a try. This really is the ultimate chill-out music.

Favourite tracks

02 – The Eyes of Truth

07 – Age of Loneliness (Carly’s Song)

Top track for action

02 – The Eyes of Truth

Top track for tension

07 – Age of Loneliness (Carly’s Song)

Top track for emotion

04 – I Love You… I’ll Kill You

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